Why Does My GE Air Conditioner Keep Freezing Up?

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A GE air conditioning is a lifesaver during the hot seasons, but it can be quite a nightmare if it is freezing up. Let's look at some of the most common reasons your GE air conditioner might be freezing up and how you can fix them.

If your GE air conditioner is freezing up, it could be due to the following reasons:

  • Colder Outside Temperature
  • Diry/Clogged Air Filter
  • Refrigerant Leak
  • Clogged Refrigerant Line
  • Faulty A/C Fan
  • Dirty Air Ducts
  • Thermostat Issues
  • Clogged Condensate Line
  • Damaged or Clogged Condenser Fins

As you can see, there are several reasons why your GE air conditioner might be freezing up. This article will discuss each of these culprits and help you decide if you can fix the problem you're experiencing or if it's time to call in a professional. In addition, we will answer other frequently asked questions about GE air conditioners, so read on!

A huge air conditioning compressor unit mounted behind on reinforced metal brackets, Why Does My GE Air Conditioner Keep Freezing Up?

What could cause my GE air conditioner to freeze?

The primary function of an air conditioner is to remove heat and humidity from the indoor air. When the unit is turned on, the compressor compresses refrigerant gas and forces it through the condenser coils.

The refrigerant is then cooled by the surrounding air and turned into liquid. This liquid refrigerant then flows through the evaporator coils, absorbing heat from the indoor air. Finally, the refrigerant evaporates into a gas and is then drawn back into the compressor to start the cycle again.

A GE logo at a showroom

If any of these components are not functioning properly, it could cause your GE air conditioner to freeze. Let's discuss each of these potential problems in more detail.

Colder Outside Temperature

One of the most common reasons your GE air conditioner might be freezing up is that the outside temperature has dropped below 70 degrees.

If it's colder outside, your air conditioner has to work harder to remove heat from the indoor air. This means that the refrigerant gas will be colder when it enters the evaporator coils.

If the refrigerant is too cold, it can cause the water in the air to condense and freeze on the coils. This can reduce the airflow and cause your air conditioner to freeze up.

Dirty/Clogged Air Filter

The air filter is responsible for trapping airborne particles, like dust and pollen, and keeping them from entering the air conditioner.

If the air filter is clogged, it can restrict airflow and cause the evaporator coils to freeze.

You should check your air filter every month and remove any build-up. In addition, you should replace your air filter every 3-6 months, depending on the size of your filter. If you have a reusable air filter, you should clean it according to the manufacturer's instructions.

Refrigerant Leak

The refrigerant makes your air conditioner cool, so if there's a leak, it can cause the unit to freeze up. Likewise, if the refrigerant is too low, it will cause the evaporator coil to become too cold. As a result, air that comes into contact with the coils will freeze.

A refrigerant leak can also cause your air conditioner to stop cooling altogether. If you think you might have a refrigerant leak, it's important to call in a professional.

A refrigerant leak can be caused by a variety of factors, such as:

  • Damage to the air conditioner
  • Improper installation
  • Manufacturing defects

If you suspect that your air conditioner is leaking refrigerant, you should call a professional to have it repaired because a refrigerant is toxic.

Clogged Refrigerant Line

The refrigerant line is responsible for carrying the refrigerant to and from the evaporator coils. If the line is clogged, it can restrict refrigerant flow and cause the evaporator coils to freeze.

Faulty A/C Fan

The A/C fan is responsible for blowing air over the evaporator coils. If the fan is not working properly, it can cause the coils to freeze.

There are a few things that can cause the A/C fan to stop working:

  • A blown fuse
  • A tripped circuit breaker
  • A bad capacitor

If you suspect that your A/C fan is not working properly, you should call in a professional to have it repaired.

Dirty Air Ducts

Dirty air ducts can restrict airflow and cause the evaporator coils to freeze. In addition, dirty air ducts can also lead to other problems, such as:

  • Decreased efficiency
  • Higher energy bills
  • Poor indoor air quality

Check your air ducts for any build-up of dust and debris. If you find any, you should clean them out. You can do this yourself or hire a professional to do it.

Man changing the dirty vent filter

Thermostat Issues

If the thermostat is not working correctly, it can cause the air conditioner to cycle on and off too frequently. This can cause the evaporator coils to freeze because they will not have enough time to thaw between cycles.

Clogged Condensate Line

The condensate line is responsible for draining the water that condenses on the evaporator coils. If the line is clogged, it can cause the coils to freeze because the water will not be able to drain correctly.

There are a few things you can do to prevent your condensate line from getting clogged:

  • Clean the line with a stiff wire
  • Pour a cup of bleach down the line once a month
  • Replace the filter in your air conditioner

If you suspect that your condensate line is clogged, you should call a professional to have it cleaned or replaced.

Damaged or Clogged Condenser Fins

The condenser fins are responsible for dissipating heat from the air conditioner. If the fins are damaged or clogged, it can cause the unit to freeze up.

When they are clogged, you can use a garden hose to spray them off. If they are damaged, you will need to call a professional to have them repaired or replaced. However, they are just bent. You can use a fin comb to straighten them out.

How long does a GE Air Conditioner Last?

Worker checking the wiring of the AC unit

Modern air conditioners are built to last 10-15 years or more. However, many factors can affect the lifespan of your air conditioner, such as:

  • The quality of the unit.
  • How often it is used.
  • How well it is maintained.

If you take good care of your air conditioner, it will last longer. To increase your air conditioners lifespan:

  • Change the air filter regularly.
  • Clean the coils.
  • Keep the area around the unit clean and free of debris.
  • Schedule yearly tune-ups with a professional.

By following these simple tips, you can help to ensure that your air conditioner lasts for many years.

What are the signs I need to replace my GE air conditioner?

If your GE air conditioner is over ten years old, you may wonder if it is time to replace it. Here are some signs that indicate you should replace your air conditioner:

Inconsistent Cooling

If your air conditioner is not cooling your home evenly, it may be time to replace it. However, if you have tried cleaning the ducts, coils, and air filter with no luck, it is probably time to replace your unit.

Warm Air from Vents

Warm air coming from your vents is also a sign that your A/C unit is on its way out. This is caused by a refrigerant leak or broken compressor, which can be repaired. However, replacing it may be more cost-effective if your unit is old.

Foul Smells

If you notice any foul smells coming from your vents, it is time to replace your air conditioner. These smells are usually caused by mold or mildew and can be a health hazard.

Strange Noises

If your air conditioner makes strange noises, such as banging, grinding, squealing, or hissing, it may be time to replace it. These noises can be caused by various things, such as loose parts or a failing compressor.

Abnormal Energy Bills

If you have noticed a significant increase in your energy bills, it could be due to your air conditioner working harder than usual. A dirty air filter or coils often cause this. However, if you have already cleaned these things and your bills are still high, it is probably time to replace your unit.

The Unit uses R-22 Freon

R-22 Freon is an outdated refrigerant that the EPA is phasing out. If your air conditioner uses this refrigerant, you will need to replace it with a newer model that uses R-410A.

Constant Repairs

Checking the pressure on the compressor unit

If your air conditioner constantly breaks down and needs repairs, it may be time to replace it. However, the repairs are starting to cost more than a new unit. Also, the older your unit gets, the more likely it is to break down.

A new A/C may be a pricey upfront investment, but it will save you money on repairs and energy bills in the long term. It will also keep your home cooler and more comfortable.

Final Thoughts

A huge air conditioning compressor unit mounted behind on reinforced metal brackets, Why Does My GE Air Conditioner Keep Freezing Up?

A GE air conditioner is a good investment for your home. They are built to last 10-15 years, but they can last even longer with proper care. If you take good care of your unit and change the air filter regularly, it will increase its lifespan.

Looking for other A/C troubleshooting articles? Here are others that might help:

Carrier AC Fan Won't Shut Off—What's Wrong?

Window Air Conditioner Blows Cold Then Warm – What's Wrong?

No Water Coming Out Of AC Drain Pipe – What's Wrong?

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